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Cities@Tufts Colloquium Series - Shared screen with speaker view
Meghan R. Tenhoff
43:52
Hello All! Welcome. Please type your questions in the chat.
Brown House watch group
59:27
How does carbon footprint of Manhattan compare with the footprint of other US cities?
Sumeeta Srinivasan UEP (she series)
01:03:18
Do you have a sense of what footprints are like in cities in developing countries? Also, is NYC and maybe San Francisco perhaps not representative of cities in the US?
Miranda Briseño (she/her)
01:04:40
Are there any examples of cities that have retroactively restored some of the harm done as a result of green lining/green gentrification? Presumably, there might be few or none. Do you have any suggestions for what cities should be doing to address the displacement that has been caused by green improvements?
Florian Zach
01:07:50
Would be interested what this presentation has to say about vienna and it I can agree with them actually living here
Florian Zach
01:08:04
if*
Rachel Bowers (she/her)
01:16:37
If air travel is such a significant contributor to carbon emissions, shouldn't there also be a large policy emphasis placed on reducing business travel? doesn't quite fit the context of the green new deal but seems important?
Navarre Bartz
01:20:12
I guess to piggyback on Rachel’s question, could a lack of airline subsidies (and bailouts) be enough to reduce business travel in a post-COVID world to manageable levels?
Miranda Briseño (she/her)
01:20:56
Brb I’m moving
David Wachsmuth, Professor
01:21:36
Thanks for an awesome presentation! Thinking about your discussion of carbon footprints in NYC, how should we distinguish between emissions driven by affluence (which in NYC happen to be located in Manhattan but aren’t strongly related to the features of urban space which influence emissions) from emissions actually driven by urban space (housing/transportation/energy use)?
Brown House watch group
01:21:44
Please don't leave Miranda, Medford needs you!!
Emma French (she/her)
01:22:43
Given the need to understand and address social and environmental justice issues simultaneously, to what extent do you see institutional capacity as a barrier to intersectional climate planning and policy? Do you see the charge being led solely by social movements and civic organizations or are public sector actors also playing a role in connecting these struggles?
Alexandra Hamby
01:26:05
@Florian thank you for sharing your personal experience/perspective. Very interesting to hear a personal perspective versus an academic one.
Florian Zach
01:31:10
Very welcome Alexandra and I do agree that the quality of living is very high and this might be that the city didn't really grow looking at the number of people living here. So the historical role might have helped very much. And the city has worked on keep the number of affordable housing high. Unfortunately private sector has higher prices and houses built after 1955 aren't regulated by the city so rent can be very expensive which is accepted as the transportation is cheep and air and water quality is very good
Florian Zach
01:31:16
👏👏👏👏👏👏👏
Meghan R. Tenhoff
01:31:16
Thank you!!
Josh McLinden (he/him)
01:31:20
thank you Daniel!!
Emma French (she/her)
01:31:21
Thank you!
Florian Zach
01:31:24
Thanks Daniel 🙏
David Wachsmuth, Professor
01:31:27
Thank you!
Navarre Bartz
01:31:33
Thanks!